Let’s return to the topic of FAT!

Okay, I just realised something. At first I thought the best way to advance Fat Acceptance was to make it known that fat does not equal bad health. Then I changed my mind and decided that since a person’s health is nobody’s business, we shouldn’t focus on that. How about “sustainable weight loss is impossible for nearly everyone” as a mantra? No, that only leads to accusations that we’re all defeatists who have “given up” (yes, even those of us who are thin … somehow).

Perhaps we should spend more time promoting the fact that weight loss is dangerous? Which is, after all, the truth. I know from experience that no matter how often you tell people that anything is none of their business, chances are they won’t listen. But if you tell them that you’re not going to follow their advice (or “advice”) because it is very dangerous? Obviously they can choose not to believe you, as with everything … I do think that this kind of discussion would be less emotionally challenging though.

Which is not to say that I’m giving up on bodily autonomy, of course. I’m just saying I may have found an alternative for those situations where facts are needed. Hey, I need to arm myself …

P.S. I do reply to my comments, but it usually takes me a while!

Hard-working vs. Lazy??

From a comment I just left on a random old blog post that I stumbled upon:

Capitalism rewards the hard-working and punishes the lazy.

No. Capitalism rewards some of each because you do not have to work hard in order to be successful. Sure, it helps. But if you think about it in more detail, capitalism rewards lucky and/or intelligent people (both not something one can become on purpose) and punishes those who:

– are disabled
– are clumsy
– are not that smart
– were abused or neglected as a child
– are mentally ill
– have been misdiagnosed for years
– grew up poor
– had no access to good education as a child
– grew up in a different country
– are unattractive
– etc.

I don’t know why I bothered, seeing as the article was a little silly and naive anyway. But, I guess it was good for something since I just remembered what I’ve been meaning to say for ages:

People with low IQs  need some love, too. Seriously. No matter how much you hear about all other kinds of discrimination, apparently everyone thinks making fun of “stupid” people is okay. I disagree. I thought I was smart (and everybody told me so) until I developed chronic pain and my ability to concentrate dissolved into nothingness. Now I know that intelligence is relative. And in the meantime I have also met many wonderful people who appeared stupid and were really just mentally ill or grew up under the shittiest circumstances. I have learned some of my most important life lessons from someone who believes he is too stupid to learn English.

Most people don’t seem to realise that you can be very bad at expressing yourself and yet have intelligent thoughts. That intelligence shows differently in different people. That being less smart than others does NOT equal being mean, lazy or ignorant. That intelligent people can be ignorant, too.

Judging people on their apparent level of intelligence is no better than judging them on their appearance, as we have little control over both. Am I the only person on earth who thinks that way?! So far I have yet to meet a single one who gets this … but then again, maybe I just can’t express myself well enough. Ha ha.

What Is A “Right”, Anyway?

A bit of random babbling sparked by the sentence, “Healthcare is not a human right, it is a service.” (No source; it has been said by enough people.) My reaction to reading that for the first time was, “I know, sure … and your point is?” I don’t believe humans have a “right” to much of anything, really.

Does a lion have the right to hunt? Yes? … Are you sure? Who decides? If you think about it, to say that a wild animal has a right to anything is ridiculous. If they hadn’t, they wouldn’t know nor care. The need for a “right” to hunt does not arise until humans constrain the lion, feel entitled to control it, and realise that it needs to hunt in order to survive – which they then generously permit. Or not.

A right has to be given … if I were the only person on earth, I’d have no rights because there would be no need for any. A right is a tiny hole in the giant net of restrictions placed upon anyone living in a civilised country. It is all a big joke. Here I am, fighting for my “rights” within a system that I don’t even want, in the absence of which those very rights would be meaningless. Social rights are, to me, only a temporary solution – a step in the right direction. What I really wish for is a world where the concept of granting someone access to the things that they need is laughable because access was never taken from them in the first place, and nobody has enough power to grant anyone anything.

I’m beginning to worry that people will start calling me insane anytime soon. To be honest, most of the things I have written on this blog lately surprised even me. They came from somewhere deep inside of me, from a part of my brain that I am not yet familiar with, although on the other hand it also seems more familiar and natural than anything else. It has always been there, but I lost sight of it for a decade or so around the time I became a teenager. As a small child, when I heard that men were expected to open doors for women but not the other way around, I could only think, “But that doesn’t make any sense.” It is amazing how much time and energy society invests in dumbing us down, stripping away that precious ability to look at the state of the world objectively and see the truth that is hiding in plain sight.

Ask any four-year-old if he or she thinks that all sick people deserve to be cured, or if they need to earn the right to it first. Go ahead and ask. But don’t be surprised if the four-year-old then thinks you’re scary for even asking.